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bad knees/hips while running

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  • bad knees/hips while running

    I used to be a runner, but I stopped about 6 months ago because my knees and hips couldn't handle it anymore. I'm taking fish oil supplements and osteo bi flex MSM w/ chondroitin every day. I purposely dont do anything that would put any impact on my joints because I dont want them to get worse.

    My joints are perfectly fine, I never feel any pain or cracking except when I run, but I would like to be able to again sometime. Im only 22 years old so I shouldnt even be having these problems!

    Has anyone ever had experience with something like this? I want to know if theres a way to heal or rebuild whatever I'm lacking in my hips and knees so I can run again. Or at least not end up in a wheelchair when I'm 60 years old lol

  • #2
    Originally posted by i_see_u View Post
    I used to be a runner, but I stopped about 6 months ago because my knees and hips couldn't handle it anymore. I'm taking fish oil supplements and osteo bi flex MSM w/ chondroitin every day. I purposely dont do anything that would put any impact on my joints because I dont want them to get worse.

    My joints are perfectly fine, I never feel any pain or cracking except when I run, but I would like to be able to again sometime. Im only 22 years old so I shouldnt even be having these problems!

    Has anyone ever had experience with something like this? I want to know if theres a way to heal or rebuild whatever I'm lacking in my hips and knees so I can run again. Or at least not end up in a wheelchair when I'm 60 years old lol
    Have you seen a doctor?

    How long had you been running before you started having problems? What distances did you run?

    Could it be something simple like the wrong pair of running shoes for you? I had knee problems with a new brand of sneakers and it stopped when I changed brands.

    In the meantime I recommend you get a bicycle. You can get a good cardio workout and be outdoors etc.

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    • #3
      After having your general practitioner check that you don't have any serious problems, it would be helpful to have your gait checked.

      Many specialist running stores have machines which can video record your feet and legs while using a running machine. A lack of support can lead to all kinds of injuries. Over-pronators are especially susceptible when insufficiently supportive shoes are used. Over-pronation is easily diagnosed and it is very well catered for by shoe manufacturers so there is plenty of brand and style choice.

      Provided that you don't have any underlying skeletal/muscular issues you should be able to progressively build back up your training after finding some good shoes.

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      • #4
        All good replies.

        You're going to end up at an orthopaedist and they have limitations as they are primarily hammer and chisel guys and not biomechanists or kinesiologists. At least find an ortho who is a limbs guy and not a back guy.

        Joints in motion are extremely difficult to diagnose since, well, they are in motion and Xrays, fMRIs etc are for stationery, motionless observation of hard and soft surfaces.

        I used to train athletes and dealt with post rehab for the majority of my work. we had a series of force absorption and force generation skill tests where we would observe the power efficiency of the athlete. This efficiency or lack thereof was always a clue to guessing at a problem. We were unique and I don't have any idea where to send you unless you can find a Mel Siff trained strength and power trainer in your area who also fully understands the use of "testing plyometrics". Good luck with that. Maybe you can find that one in a 1,000,000 physiotherapist who has both talents.

        You didn't really tell us what your joint issues are (sounds?) so without any further info, I'm outtahere.

        Edit: Find a physiotherapist who specializes in foot problems and has one of those foot pressure plates in his office. Physiotherapy Associates (Stryker) used to have this equipment in many of their locations. They can have you run across it and it will take measurements on force application. As mentioned above, along with looking at your foot strike patterns on the bottom of your shoes, they can start guessing the loci of your problems.
        Last edited by MU!!; December 28th, 2012, 02:35 PM.

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