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Selective erasure of memory

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  • Selective erasure of memory

    In the 13 March issue of Science, there is an article titled "Selective Erasure of a Fear Memory." The authors managed to erase a specific learned fear memory by targeting individual neurons with high expression of CREB, a transcription factor active in neurons during learning. After training rats, the neurons with high levels of CREB were ablated using a diphtheria toxin vector. Once ablated, the learned fear response was gone.

    This is one of the first of many experiments in which neuroscientists are going to try to demonstrate that a memory trace occupies specific neurons.

    Very cool.

    ~~ Paul

  • #2
    Interesting.
    Thanks, Paul.

    Do these results, in your opinion, totally bash the brain as a tuner theory?

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    • #3
      No, not if you're willing to go with the "neuron as tuner" variant. Every sub-memory will have a neuron as its tuner. No matter how much research we do to understand how neurons work, and no matter that there is no evidence for a tuner in the neuron, people will claim that the memory is not in the neuron but in the aether somewhere. They will also ignore the fact that moving memories outside the brain does nothing to explain how consciousness works. And at no time will I understand why this makes people feel better.

      ~~ Paul

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